Nanny to Mommy: Winter Travel Tips from Evenflo and Kelley Blue Book

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Friday, January 30, 2015

Winter Travel Tips from Evenflo and Kelley Blue Book

Thanks to Evenflo and Kelley Blue Book, here is a great guide for winter travel safety as well as car seat safety.

1. Baby, it’s cold outside! Remember to take off bulky coats before placing your child in his/her car seat, as coats can compress during a crash. Coats can be worn backwards over the harness, after the child has been secured. You can also keep extra blankets in the car to place over your child, once they are secured. - Car seat option: Evenflo Platinum Protection Series

2. Traveling by plane this holiday season? It is recommended that all children use age-appropriate car seats on planes – even kids under 2. Check with your carrier, as some offer discounted rates to purchase seats for children under 2, and any restrictions it may have about car seat use in flight. Also, check the label on your car seat to make sure it is FAA approved. - Car seat option: Evenflo ProComfort Protection Series
3. Traveling by car this holiday season? Did you know that approximately 70% of car seats are installed incorrectly? Make sure to have your car seat checked by a certified car seat technician before you hit the road for the holidays. -  Car seat option: Evenflo SureSafe System


1. Make certain your electrical system is prepared for cold, wet weather. Cold diminishes the effectiveness of a car’s battery, so if your battery was on the edge in the fall, the winter will send it over the cliff. What that means is your car won’t start or, if it does start, it might leave you stranded on the side of the road. If you haven’t purchased a battery in a while, have your car battery and the charging system checked. A new alternator – the thing that charges your battery – might also be required.

2. Make sure your car has proper antifreeze/coolant in the cooling system. Antifreeze is a no-brainer when the temperature dips below freezing. What is less intuitive is that your car can still overheat even when it is freezing outside. Make sure you have antifreeze/coolant that is up to the job by having it checked. And a check of belts and hoses at the same time is advisable.

3. Check out your tires. At the very least make sure your all-season tires have good tread depth and are at proper inflation pressures. If you live in the Snow Belt, dedicated winter tires could well be a better solution. That involves some expense but amortized over several winters the cost will likely be worth it due to the safety and peace of mind you gain.

4. Visibility is often compromised in winter weather, so be certain your windshield wipers and windshield washers are working properly. If you wipers have been soaking up the sun all summer, they are probably compromised, so treat your car to a new set. And make certain your windshield washer reservoir is filled with wiper solvent, not plain water that can freeze and render them inoperable. Check that rear wiper and washer, too, if you have one.

5. Prepare your winter driving skills. In the winter you will often drive over surfaces that are compromised by snow, ice and freezing rain. Learn how to handle your car in these situations by practicing in an empty parking lot. Bad weather rewards patience and smoothness.

6. Don’t drive on “E.” Bad weather can descend on you quickly, and it might leave you marooned. In such an instance the last thing you want to do is run out of gas, because that can turn your car’s warm cabin into a deep freeze. You don’t have to top off every day, but don’t run the car near empty either.

7. Plan for a worst-case scenario. Despite your best efforts, you might find yourself stranded. That’s when prior preparation can help you. Having warm clothing, gloves, an operating flashlight, and water or liquids in the car can aid your survival and rescue in inclement weather. If you live in an area that gets heavy snow, chains can aid traction considerably and kitty litter can help you extricate your car if it gets stuck. Throw in a good book, and you can profitably pass the time.
KBB has also share the 10 Best Cars for Winter!
Stay safe out there everyone! What are some winter travel safety tips that you have, but weren't shared here? Please share!

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